Militia meltdown: Is Oregon standoff really about government insiders selling U.S. uranium to Russia?

Militia meltdown: Is Oregon standoff really about government insiders selling U.S. uranium to Russia?

Robert “LaVoy” Finicum, the spokesman for an armed militia occupying an Oregon wildlife refuge, was shot and killed during a traffic stop Tuesday. The anti-government activists seized the site in protest of the federal government’s treatment of Dwight and Steven Hammond, who were sentenced to prison for unpaid grazing fees and setting fires on federally owned land. Given the federal government’s brute handling of the controversy, some suspect alternative motives may be at work.

The standoff took place 70 miles north of Burns, Oregon, where protests over the Hammond ranch caused activists to occupy a federal building earlier this month. The occupiers were led by Ammon Bundy, son of Cliven Bundy, the key figure in the 2014 Bundy standoff. The FBI stopped a vehicle harboring Bundy, his brother, Finicum and others who were on their way to a public event.(1)

“Agents with the FBI stopped the vehicle, at which point one of the individuals in the vehicle pulled out a weapon,” The Wall Street Journal reports. “At that point, FBI agents fired [and] the individual who was brandishing the weapon suffered fatal injuries, officials said.”(1)

Hammond Ranch a gold mine for uranium

Unanswered questions remain about why the feds came down so hard on the protesters and occupiers. One possible reason is that the federal government needs to seize the Hammond ranch for its precious metals and uranium. According to the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), a federal agency under the Department of the Interior:

“In September 2011, a representative from Oregon Energy, L.L.C. (formally Uranium One), met with local citizens, and county and state officials, to discuss the possibility of opening a uranium oxide (‘yellowcake’) mine in southern Malheur County in southeastern Oregon.”(2)

Uranium One controls a good portion of uranium production in the US. Russia gradually took over Uranium One in three separate transactions from 2009 to 2013. Now, Vladimir Putin controls 20 percent of all uranium production capacity in the US.(2,3)

Clinton Foundation played pivotal role in securing Uranium One deal with Russia

During that time, a flow of cash made its way to the Clinton Foundation. After Russia announced its plan to take over Uranium One, former President Bill Clinton received $500,000 for a Moscow speech from a Russian investment bank with ties to the Kremlin.(3)

In other words, there is good reason to believe that the Clinton Foundation helped sell Uranium One to the Russians by ensuring them US plutonium. Therefore, it’s possible the recent Oregon standoff wasn’t fueled by the activities of Dwight and Steven Hammond, but by government insiders trying to sell US uranium to Russia.(2)

According to this theory, the reason why US authorities have been so hard on the protesters is because they are occupying a valuable piece of land – a piece that was promised to Russia for its plutonium resources.

The New York Times states, “Whether the donations [to the Clinton Foundation] played any role in the approval of the uranium deal is unknown. But the episode underscores the special ethical challenges presented by the Clinton Foundation, headed by a former president who relied heavily on foreign cash to accumulate $250 million in assets even as his wife helped steer American foreign policy as secretary of state, presiding over decisions with the potential to benefit the foundation’s donors.”(3)

Could the Clintons be behind what’s going on at Hammond Ranch? It’s certainly possible. The Clinton Foundation played a crucial role in securing the Plutonium One deal with the Russians. If that deal involved uranium mining in Oregon, then the recent events surrounding Hammond Ranch shouldn’t be chalked up merely to coincidence.

Sources include:

(1) ZeroHedge.com

(2) JonRappoport.WordPress.com

(3) NYTimes.com